Music documentaries on Netflix are particularly satisfying because they run the gamut from concert footage from established acts like Bob Marley, Biggie, Tupac, Justin Timberlake and Keith Richards, to more explorative films about unheralded musicians who have lived extraordinaire lives.

Whether you’re looking to be transported to far-flung venues – to pretend you were lucky enough to nab a ticket to a once in a lifetime event – or simply a fan of quality storytelling, we’ve compiled the best music documentaries on Netflix.

20 Feet From Stardom

Awarded an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature at the 86th Academy Awards, 20 Feet From Stardom chronicles the lives of the backup singers who have aided some of the most noteworthy vocalists in modern music history like Sting, Bruce Springsteen, Mick Jagger, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Ray Charles and more.

While living a life as a working musician is certainly noteworthy, the film excels in asking the question, did these singers want more?

Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory

Most people – regardless of the genre one prefers – often speak of the “power” of music. In Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory, filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the experiences of individuals around the country who have been seen their lives transformed, repaired and enriched through music’s healing powers.

Exploring individuals suffering from debilitating memory loss, to how the brain itself interprets songs from a neurological standpoint, the film was awarded the Audience Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

Ballet 422

Ballet 422 shines a light on the arduous, two-month process that goes into crafting a new work at the New York City Ballet during the troupe’s winter season of 2013.

Viewers are introduced to a young choreographer, Justin Peck, whose “Paz de la Jolla” piece has all the makings of a hit. But as expected, there are countless bumps along the way which ultimately finds everyone involved questioning if it’s all worth it.

Beware of Mr. Baker

Drummer, Ginger Baker, first entered the public consciousness for his percussive contributions to early albums for the likes of Cream, Blind Faith and Fela Kuti.

Over the course of his career, Baker has checked off all the major milestones that go along with becoming a living legend; including rampant drug usage, exotic pilgrimages, violence, broken relationships with family, and bankruptcy.

Drummer, Ginger Baker, first entered the public consciousness for his percussive contributions to early albums for the likes of Cream, Blind Faith and Fela Kuti.

Over the course of his career, Baker has checked off all the major milestones that go along with becoming a living legend; including rampant drug usage, exotic pilgrimages, violence, broken relationships with family, and bankruptcy.

Biggie & Tupac

There are usually two roads to travel when examining the lives of Christopher Wallace and Tupac Shakur. The first, is usually more uplifting and examines how both men used hip-hop music to elevate both themselves and those around them. The second, attempts to finally answer the question; who are the people responsible for their murders?

In Biggie & Tupac, Nick Broomfield’s documentary falls into the latter category and points his finger at Death Row head honcho, Suge Knight, and subsequent police misconduct by the LAPD.

Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey

2007 proved to be an important year for the band, Journey. Not only was their song, “Don’t Stop Believin’” used in the final scene of The Sopranos, but they also set out to find a new lead singer to replace Steve Augeri.

While scouring YouTube, Journey guitarist, Neal Schon, discovered an untapped, but powerful voice he thought could carry the power ballads. The only problem; Arnel Pineda was a world away in the Philippines and they had no idea if he spoke English.

So began the unlikely story of Pineda’s journey to join Journey.

Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me

With over 50 million records sold – resulting in a contribution to country music that many think catapulted the genre into the mainstream – Glen Campbell is perhaps second-to-none.

In Glen Campbell: Ill Be Me, the singer is forced to reckon with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and his desire for one last tour that will both satiate his fans, and that little voice inside his head which reminds him of the heights he reached as a musician.

I Called Him Morgan

Kasper Collin’s poignant documentary shines a light on the life of jazz trumpeter, Lee Morgan – who earned his musical stripes from the likes of Dizzy Gillespie and Art Blakey – and was fatally shot by his common-law wife, Helen, inside of a Harlem nightclub in 1972.

Bouncing from a timeline that details how Helen helped Morgan pull himself up by his bootstraps, to revealing audio interviews with her after she was incarcerated and then released, the film is somber, impactful and mysterious.

Janis: Little Girl Blue

Before her untimely death at just 27 years old, singer/songwriter, Janis Joplin, endeared herself to people all around the world thanks to vocal qualities wholly unique to her.

Narrated by Chan Marshall (Cat Power), Janis: Little Girl Blue explores the life of the singer through interviews with her family, peers like the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir, and contemporary musicians who she had a profound impact on like Pink, Melissa Ethridge and Juliette Lewis.